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Island of Skopelos

Why holiday in Skopelos?

This mountainous island in the north Aegean Sea is completely unspoiled. Olive groves, orchards and pine forests are honeycombed with scenic walking trails. And along the coast there are many beaches from from pebbly coves with mountain views, to coves hidden by the cliffs which can only be reached by boat

The island's capital, Skopelos Town, lets you take it easy by day, and let your hair down at night. The town is surrounded by lushious green hills, and full of faded white cottages that stand down near to the waterfront. Kastro, which is the name of the towns old quarter, is set up high on the hilltop. Follow the stepped alleyways up to its Venetian castle, and the sea views stretch out for miles. In the evenings, the city springs into life, with people spilling out of the tiny bars and restaurants.

 

 

Head south from Skopelos Town, and you'll stumble upon the village of Staphylos. It's nestled in the middle of a valley, and the whole place is blanketed in pine trees. As for whats here, there's simply a scattering of bougainvillea-smothered shops and houses, which huddle around a sandy bay. Glossa, in the north-west of the island, offers the best window into the Greece of yesterday. This picturesque hamlet is packed with rainbow-coloured window shutters and Venetian towers that march down to the sea.

Skopelos Town is the centre of Skopelos, a little Aegean island just off the east of Greece. It's achingly Greek, with family-run tavernas along the water and an old town which cascades down to the clear blue sea. The streets are narrow and lined with whitewashed buildings with red-tiled roofs. And if you're after churches, there is a cluster of them here to explore.

Resorts in Skopelos

 

Skopelos Town

Located on the same side of the island as Skopelos town, just 5 kilometres away, this is a pebble bay, shaped much like a keyhole, with a narrow exit to the open sea. There are a lot of underwater springs here so the sea water feels less salty than other beaches, and it is probably one of the coldest places to swim in winter!

Although the beach itself is not the island's prettiest, (in our opinion), there is the definite appeal of being able to enjoy the mini boat excursion if you choose to get here by the little water taxi. This usually departs from Skopelos waterfront a couple of times per day (weather permitting). The boat taxi is operated by the same family which owns the single taverna at Glysteri, which is well known for serving some very good seafood dishes- the tuna stifado and the grouper head soup are the special menu recommendations here.

You can also reach Glysteri by car-there is a good surfaced road (albeit very narrow in parts) all the way to the beach.

A harbour lined with cafes and tavernas, and a maze of alleyways overflowing with churches and chapels - Skopelos Town has a strong sense of tradition combined with a laid-back, welcoming atmosphere which will immediately draw you in to the relaxed pace which is very much a way of life here.

The town is a designated preservation area, with attractive white houses cascading in layers down the hillside from the ruins of the Venetian castle above to the lively harbour below.

Along its bustling waterfront exclusive restaurants, cosmopolitan shops and excellent bars and tavernas shelter under the magnificent Mulberry and plane trees. Whilst in the maze of cobblestoned streets behind there are over 125 chapels hidden amongst the pretty whitewashed cottages with their brightly painted doors and shutters.

The crowning glory of Skopelos Town is the 13th century Venetian kastro - although having climbed the steep and narrow streets of the town to reach this wonderful ruin, the sight of the nearby cafe whose owner is an excellent bouzouki player is often as welcome as the spellbinding views.

Panormos

The area where Panormos village is located is a very scenic bay with fine pebbles, surrounded by lots of vegetation.

The beach is well organized and attracts visitors not only because it is picturesque, but also due to its location since it is one of the most easily accessible beaches of Skopelos.

There you can find restaurants, bars,two mini markets and various other tourist facilities such as rental cars or boats, day trips around the island, etc.

Staphylos

On the south more protected from the wind- side of the island there are the most beaches on Skopelos.
The first beach someone meets when exiting the town of Skopelos, at a distance of 4 km, is Stafylos, one of the most well-known and visited beaches of the island, which took its name from king Stafylos.
It is a beautiful pine bay, with a sandy beach and clear waters. The beach at Stafylos is organized, with a beach bar and a lifeguard.
If you use a bus for your transport, keep in mind that it stops on the road from Skopelos to Glossa, and from there you will have to walk about 500m to get to the beach.

Glysteri

Located on the same side of the island as Skopelos town, just 5 kilometres away, this is a pebble bay, shaped much like a keyhole, with a narrow exit to the open sea. There are a lot of underwater springs here –so the sea water feels less salty than other beaches, and it is probably one of the coldest places to swim in winter!

Although the beach itself is not the island's prettiest, (in our opinion), there is the definite appeal of being able to enjoy the mini boat excursion if you choose to get here by the little water taxi. This usually departs from Skopelos waterfront a couple of times per day (weather permitting). The boat taxi is operated by the same family which owns the single taverna at Glysteri, which is well known for serving some very good seafood dishes- the tuna stifado and the grouper head soup are the food special recommendations here.

You can also reach Glysteri by car-there is a good surfaced road (albeit very narrow in parts) all the way to the beach.

Getting to Skopelos

The fact that there is no airport on Skopelos can only enhance your holiday as it means that none of the big package holiday companies go there.

To get to Skopelos you fly to Skiathos from either Birmingham, East Midlands, Gatwick, Manchester or Newcastle with most flights departing on Fridays. From Skiathos you take the Flying Dolphin which takes approx. 1 hour to reach Skopelos.

You will be met at Skiathos Airport where a taxi will be waiting to take you to the port for the next available hydrofoil or ferry. Another representative awaits your arrival on Skopelos.

Skopelos can also be reached by ferry from Agios Konstantinos on the mainland.

Perfect Blue Holidays offer a full travel service including flights, car hire and private taxi transfers as well as apartments, hotels and villas on an accommodation-only basis.


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